Filing Deadlines for Optional Practical Training (OPT)

Are you a foreign student applying for post-completion Optional Practical Training (OPT)?  Are you wondering what filing deadlines exist for your case?

There are several deadlines to consider in handling an OPT application.  A student must properly file his or her Form I-765 up to 90 days prior to his or her program end-date and no later than 60 days after his or her program end-date. The student must also file the Form I-765 with USCIS within 30 days of the date the Designated School Official (DSO) enters the recommendation of OPT into his or her SEVIS record. In addition to the deadlines provided in the regulation, the Form I-765 instructions (item 3.A. on page 2) require that an I-20 submitted with Form I-765 requesting OPT must be “endorsed by a Designated School Official within the past 30 days.”

Until recently, when USCIS received an OPT application more than 30 days after the DSO entered the OPT recommendation in SEVIS, it would often send the applicant a Request for Evidence requiring a new Form I-20 signed by the DSO. The DSO could simply reprint the Form I-20 from SEVIS (without entering a new OPT recommendation in SEVIS) and sign it, and the student could submit it to USCIS. However, USCIS has recently taken the position that the phrase “within 30 days of the date the DSO enters the recommendation of OPT into his or her SEVIS record,” does not allow this approach, and applications submitted more than 30 days after the DSO’s recommendation of OPT in SEVIS are now being denied.

To avoid a denial of an OPT application, the student must file it with USCIS within 30 days of the OPT recommendation in SEVIS. If a student is unable to submit the Form I-765 and supporting I-20 to USCIS within 30 days of the OPT recommendation in SEVIS, the DSO should cancel the original OPT recommendation in SEVIS and enter a new recommendation. Simply issuing a new Form I-20, which was acceptable until recently, will no longer suffice.

AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 12072441 (posted Oct. 19, 2012)